Chinese New Year 2020

Chinese Lanterns

Chinese Lanterns

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The Chinese New Year holiday is a sacred and special holiday, which follows the lunar calendar, which is why it is on a different date every year.  It is also known as the Lunar New Year, and is cherished by many. This year, it had landed on January 25th, and the festival usually lasts for days at a time. It is also known as the spring festival, and is cherished every year with a different animal, which originates from the Chinese Zodiac.

 Massive celebrations such as firework shows, traditional dances, and smaller festivals are held every year to celebrate the holiday, but unfortunately, these events have ceased to exist or be celebrated this year, due to regulations by the Chinese Government due to the new epidemic of the Coronavirus. So far, 2000 have been infected with around 80 deaths. Massive celebrations in Beijing, Hong Kong, and Shanghai have all been cancelled. Still, celebrations and festivals have been held around the world, most notably in Chinatown-based cities across the United States. 

While Chinese New Year is a generally fun holiday full of festivities, it is also a holiday with a lot of symbolism. Symbolism that is represented throughout food, music, rituals, and more. Red envelopes along with tangerines are usually placed by children’s bedsides to commemorate the large celebration, although the holiday isn’t usually materially based. There is usually a small amount of cash within the red envelope, so the true spirit of the holiday still gets across. Other symbols such as the dragon and brightly colored lanterns are scattered throughout the different celebrations that take place all over the world. One of the more family- oriented festivities would be the reunion dinner, that usually takes place within family settings. The Chinese Zodiac by itself is also a fun and key part of the holiday. It is comparable to the Western Zodiac, but each sign/animal is represented by a different year. 

One would not suspect such a large and widely beloved holiday to have a humble beginning, yet the Chinese New Year is just that. It originated as somewhat of a break, for hard-working farmers to rest from their hard year of labor. This aspect has not changed, as Chinese citizens still view the holiday as not only a fun and festival-filled aspect of their culture, but the end of a long and hard year, which is perfect for rest. 

While Chinese New Year is a generally fun holiday full of festivities, it is also a holiday with a lot of symbolism. Symbolism that is represented throughout food, music, rituals, and more. Red envelopes along with tangerines are usually placed by children’s bedsides to commemorate the large celebration, although the holiday isn’t usually materially based. There is usually a small amount of cash within the red envelope, so the true spirit of the holiday still gets across. Other symbols such as the dragon and brightly colored lanterns are scattered throughout the different celebrations that take place all over the world. One of the more family- oriented festivities would be the reunion dinner, that usually takes place within family settings. The Chinese Zodiac by itself is also a fun and key part of the holiday. It is comparable to the Western Zodiac, but each sign/animal is represented by a different year. 

One would not suspect such a large and widely beloved holiday to have a humble beginning, yet the Chinese New Year is just that. It originated as somewhat of a break, for hard-working farmers to rest from their hard year of labor. This aspect has not changed, as Chinese citizens still view the holiday as not only a fun and festival-filled aspect of their culture, but the end of a long and hard year, which is perfect for rest. 

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